November 10, 2010 – Coyote Creek Bike Trail, Cerritos

Early in my caching career (2004/5) when hides were few and far between, I found most of the easy ones from Ventura to San Pedro. I HAD to go to Orange County to build up my numbers. As the Los Angeles & Ventura county maps filled up with green boxes I stopped going to the OC. Now, years later my Orange County map had only a few old smilies, all surrounded by hundreds of ‘new’ caches. The Kollection of North Orange County Kachers (K.N.O.C.K) Coyote Creek Bike Trail event was the perfect incentive for me to go back.

Arriving at the huge well maintained park I unloaded my bike and rode to the trailhead above, where the event organizers had the sign-in sheet. They also uploaded the all important pocket query into my Oregon 450t. I received general information on the trail conditions and got started.

This is the path going South. For the first mile, with no hiding places on the left, the caches were on the right (West).

I remember mostly no-hint micros. I probably wouldn’t have found this one if another cacher who walked by hadn’t told me where to look.

I skipped the caches along backyard fences with barking dogs and gardening residents. The path made a right angle turn across a bridge and then continued along the East bank. Cachers tended to accumulate at the more difficult hides.

A few more no-hint fenceline vegetation hides later, instead of continuing South for 15+ more caches, I turned around and headed back. I packed up my bike and drove to McDonalds for lunch and wi-fi. After a McDouble and large carmel frappe’ I returned to the trailhead in a much better mood. Biking North this time, at least the backyard walls were higher and made mostly of cinderblocks.

There were still vegetation hides. I almost kept pedaling here. Note my archaic 1977 bike, turned around to keep it from falling over on the sloping ground. Weirdly the cache was an easy find.

FlagLady and not tom had a more difficult time farther North. I joined forces with them and with the duneriders. 2lablovers joined us off and on for the rest of the day.

We rode to the Northernmost cache and worked our way back South toward the trailhead. This was my favorite part of the path because it was along mostly deserted (Sunday) industrial areas and not residential backyards. There was room for bigger cache containers and many different hiding styles. I didn’t see anything I hadn’t encountered before but the variety kept things interesting and enjoyable.

There were 2 underpass hides as well. These were easy and fast finds.

Back in the residential area at least one cache had fallen into a backyard. A custom retrieval tool was cobbled together.

Here’s (Mr.) duneriders successfully using it assisted by not tom and 2lablovers.

We arrived back at the trailhead after 5pm and parted company. I logged 44 finds. Without the group the number would’ve been around 30 due to my various caching shortcomings. I’m picky, slow, lazy and easily distracted.

It was my first bike ride since the Trail of Terror (Riverside) in October 2009 so I expected to be limping around the next day. For reasons unknown I had not even a hint of soreness. Oh well. If any of my SFV or L.A. friends are planning to cache the Coyote Creek Bike Trail I recommend the Northern leg. If walking, a car shuttle would be best.

Thank you K.N.O.C.K. for putting together the power trail and organizing the event. I’m sorry that I don’t remember your individual names. Take that as a compliment. If my brain says you look ‘normal’ I won’t recall your name or recognize you again until we have an extended conversation. 😛

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