NOVEMBER 29, 2017 – (near) FORT IRWIN & KRAMER JUNCTION

November 29, 2017

As sometimes happens at my Barstow motel, I awoke at dawn to the sound of motorcycle engines revving and their riders shouting greetings to each other. Some people just don’t care. The commotion stopped me from going back to sleep and I was soon on the 15 fwy. At the nearby Fort Irwin Road offramp I drove toward the fort on the ultra well maintained 1 lane non-freeway. The lack of traffic going my way made it easy to stop and look for roadside caches. The one here Cave to Nowhere (GCHFG7) was different. It was 400’ off road and reached via a side road. The GPS compass stubbornly pointed directly at the cave. Even though it’s only 20 feet deep I wasn’t going inside. I was more afraid that someone used the cave as an outdoor toilet than of any physical danger. Luckily for me a prior finder re-hid the cache 25’ to the left of the entrance.

Returning to the road, a few miles later I stopped at “Boring” and turned east, off road.

The rocky dirt made me glad that I drive on all-terrain tires. This is “Who Cairns.”

For the 3rd time, “Resting Rattler” didn’t appear on my Garmin’s screen. The image (a small snake) in the cache name stops it from showing onscreen. Next time I’m going to write the coordinates on paper. Then I worked my way up the tail end of the alphabet series until I reached my own cache, “Lick-A-Lizard,” which I retrieved and archived.

There was enough remaining daylight to drive back to Barstow and then 30 miles east to Kramer Junction. From there I drove south peeling off to either side to find caches.

A f0t0m0m cache involved hiking to the top of a low hill. It was a good place to view the surrounding terrain.

Some caches were interesting containers that wouldn’t last a day in less remote areas. On this one the log is in the Altoids tin on the dog’s right side.

I’m not sure what this is supposed to be. The cache is in a container in the black tube. The metal box is screwed shut and sounded empty.

In 2 days I found 2 + 24 caches and a bunch of rocks for my tumblers. Weather permitting, I hope to go back to the desert again next month.

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NOVEMBER 28, 2017 – LAVIC SIDING & PISGAH CRATER

November 28, 2017

After Thanksgiving dinner I drove to my standby motel in Barstow eager for an early start in the morning to rock hound at the world famous Lavic Siding jasper fields. Most newbie rock hounds would’ve been out of their element. But as a desert geocacher the 45 mile drive on Route 66 felt comfortably familiar. The turnout for Lavic Siding is at geocache 155-Route 66 (GC2JXWB).

I parked only .25 miles in, planning to hike a circle while looking for jaspers for my rock tumblers.

Immediately I saw that no hike was needed. The ground was COVERED with red, yellow and red-yellow jaspers. This is the view at parking.

I walked about 500’ away in each direction, collecting on my walk back and then depositing in my Subaru. The sheer abundance of jaspers was overwhelming and I wanted to grab everything. It’s legal to take “reasonable amounts” for non-commerical personal use.

After a few minutes I became selective and avoided rocks with extreme shapes, visible fractures, deep holes or pits. I took home about 15 lbs to fit in my table top tumblers. Here’s the first batch.

The afternoon was spent 4 miles west, geocaching at Pisgah Crater.

Here’s ground zero at a lava outcropping. The cache was a rodent-chewed decon container.

And a sea of untumblable volcanic rocks was underfoot.

The next cache was a DNF and the one after that was in a lava clearing.

More caches were ahead but so were a dozen wildly speeding quads on the narrowing road. Instead of risking a collision or breathing volcanic dust I went back to Barstow to recharge for another day of geocaching.


SEPTEMBER 26, 2017 – ARCHIVING AHMANSON

September 26, 2017

Nine years ago I placed 7 caches on the North/South trail in the area formerly known as Ahmanson Ranch, beginning at the North terminus of Las Virgenes Road. One was archived later because bees made a hive inside the attachment structure. The remaining 6 stayed active for 9 full years with only 1 muggling until I retrieved and archived them this weekend. That’s (6 x 9)= 54 cache years! Why archived? 9 years is a long time and new find logs were increasingly few and far between. And the containers needed to be retrieved while I’m still physically able to hike (slowly) and not left as geo-trash. The 6 mile roundtrip hike started here:

The strong natural sulfur stench just beyond the trailhead triggered memories of crowded past hikes where muggles sometimes turned around and left in disgust. This time the trail was empty except for about a dozen mountain bikers.

It felt great to be outside in less than 3 digit heat. My first stop was at this hollow on the East side of the trail. It’s ground zero for someone else’s cache – that I couldn’t find. Missing?

Continuing North I passed the location of the archived bee-invaded cache. It’s bee-free now and the structure is ready for someone else to attach a magnetized cache container.

Most of the trail was brown. Only a few short sections were green.

I retrieved 2 caches and the 3rd was muggled. The 4th was a still-in-place decon container in the pipe/pillar, lower center below.

On past hikes I’d noticed some rectangular concrete posts scattered along the trail. I finally realized that they’re old hitching posts with their metal rings broken off.

The hike was mostly flat with the only noticeable elevation change about 2-1/2 miles in, approaching cache #5.

After retrieving #5 and #6 I kept walking 0.18 miles beyond to Skippy is a Little Less Lazy (GC75K3H) to find and log it. Then I hiked back on the same trail. At the midpoint I saw a jumbo size coyote walking ahead on the trail. Do I have a picture? Yes, but no one wants to see a blurry coyote butt. A shouting, speeding biker scared it off.

Here are the retrieved & archived cache containers. All are the original ones I placed in 2009. They’re in surprisingly good condition and might have lasted another 9 years.

I plan to retrieve and archive my 26 remaining caches by the end of the year.


July 23, 2017 – A Big Change

July 22, 2017

Dweeb’s Diatribe is approaching its 10th anniversary. In those 10 years I wrote 222 posts about almost as many geocaching expeditions. But all things must end. Changes to how the game is played and the general deterioration of the socio-political climate make caching far less enjoyable. My caching has slowed to a trickle. I no longer attend events and I’m well on my way to archiving or adopting-out all of my caches.

But I still enjoy being outdoors and know that it’s essential to maintaining good health. Taking full advantage of navigation and outdoor skills honed by geocaching, I now participate in some related and mutually complimentary hobbies like desert & beach rock hounding, rock tumbling, metal detecting and amateur (ham) radio. I’m changing Dweeb’s Diatribe to add all of these. I still plan to geocache occasionally, especially in the desert where I can also look for tumbling rocks at the same time.

For those who are only interested in reading about caching, sorry. I’m continuing the Diatribe, even if no one else reads it, so that it’ll be my hobby diary to enjoy when I’m old and homebound. And maybe reading and remembering will stave off dementia.

If you’re a regular reader who’s going away, thanks for staying as long as you did and for your comments, here and on Facebook.


MAY 19, 2017 – Rosamond (Kern County)

May 18, 2017

Last weekend I combined geocaching with my new rock tumbling hobby. I drove 55 miles N, mostly on the 14, to Gem Hill in Rosamond. It’s a famous location for rock hounds because it’s public land and collecting rocks is completely legal. Familiarity with Google Earth from geocaching was a huge help. Not only did it lead me to a wide open parking spot, it showed me an easy mostly flat ½ mile hiking trail around the back side of the hill.

The hike led here, where I’d seen the green ground cover on the satellite map. There was much evidence of previous digging. Inexplicably there were no geocaches.

Youtube videos and online posts showed/described other rock collectors using shovels, sledgehammers and even a gas powered jackhammer to break rocks from exposed veins. I just picked up scraps that they missed. Visual scanning, another skill honed while geocaching was extremely helpful.

In 2 hours I collected enough rocks to make several batches of tumbled (polished) rocks and walked back to my Subaru. On my way to a MASSIVE cluster of caches, the Old Dusty Road series, I stopped for a closer look at an especially healthy Joshua tree.

They’re in bloom now. Or do pods count as blooms? I’ve heard that they’re edible but look closely. Those white wormy looking parts aren’t very appetizing.
Near the SE intersection of the 14 & Backus Road I started caching at a random dirt road. Traveling was easy. And with both the 14 visible to the W and Sierra Hwy to the E there was no danger of being stranded without help.

The first cache, ODR’s #812 (GC7484B). It was an easy find only a few steps from the road as were half of the other 20 caches I visited. What’s “XMD?” It’s the Facebook mega-group “Explorers of the Mojave Desert.” And the magnetic “Geocaching” sign is for suspicious locals and law enforcement in case they drive up behind me. They might still demand to know what I’m doing but at least their first thought won’t be, “trash dumper,” “tortoise poacher,” or something similar.

Unlike most other desert series I’ve visited, the caches I found here were all camo’d and almost all in tough scratchy bushes. To be fair to the hider there weren’t many rocks or pieces of loose vegetation available to make geopiles. I DNF’d many because I didn’t want to rip up my hands reaching for containers I couldn’t see.

On the way back to Backus Road (fwy onramp is at the left edge of the bridge) my final find was a large non-series cache, Red Castle (GC71ETG).

There was a geocoin inside, the 3rd one I found on this trip. All 3 were old and owned by Jim, “f0t0m0m.” Maybe he dumped his collection into caches. He surely knows that the coins will inevitably disappear soon, taken by casual players who don’t know what to do with them. I DO know what to do and will drop them into non-urban caches in the hope that they’ll remain in circulation longer.


APRIL 26, 2017 – Point Lobos (Monterey County)

April 25, 2017

When I vacation in Monterey I try to expand my knowledge of the area by taking day trips farther afield. This time, only a mile beyond my previous southernmost excursion I reached Point Lobos. The geocaching map showed multiple earth caches and multis in the State Reserve. Page comments indicated that no physical caches are allowed. The multis had numerous (too many for me) stops to gather clues for cache containers hidden outside the reserve.

I don’t like to spend outdoor time, especially on vacations, compiling clues/data for earth caches and multi caches. It was especially true for this visit because I wanted to enjoy the great scenery and easy hike I’d seen featured online. The “lot full” sign at the entrance was ominous. And the 2 cars ahead of me turned around and exited. I expected to be turned away. But the entry booth ranger said there were still open spaces and waved me through on my California Explorer entry/parking pass. Apparently the turned around cars didn’t want to pay the $10. fee.

A short drive through a gloomy forest led to a series of small beachside parking lots. I stepped out at the third one and walked to the waterline just as it started to sprinkle. The view wasn’t especially good.

What I noticed the most was what was underfoot. It was either heaven or hell for a new rock tumbler like me. There were more great rocks than I could possible tumble in multiple lifetimes but they were strictly illegal to take according to multiple posted signs. I ended up with a handful of crappy ones from the Cannery Row tourist beach 18 miles away.

After poking around the rocks I joined the tourist muggle stream walking north on a well marked trail. The sprinkles stopped and the view improved.

Here are the muggles ahead of me. The ones near me looked oddly at my twin hiking poles. I’m sure they became envious when I walked steadily uphill over broken ground and uneven wooden steps while they struggled.

The views improved even more with increasing altitude and sunlight. Somewhere below a lone sea lion barked.

An abrupt end to the trail made me turn inland to find another one.

There, poison oak and its folk remedy mugwort grew abundantly together. I saw only 1 small warning sign. I feel sorry for people who don’t see the sign or don’t read English and unwittingly brush the PO.

Side trails each led to a viewpoint. I knew that every stop contained clues for the multi caches and/or earthcaches but instead of looking for them I enjoyed the scenery. Except for a rude (Russian?) speaking family picnicking against the posted rules and hogging this site, everyone else politely took their pictures and moved aside.

Just when I thought that there couldn’t possibly be better views, there were. Oddly, most of the muggles had turned back apparently unwilling to hike around the mud puddles from rains earlier in the week. Wimps!!

They missed this too! Now, nearly alone, I wished that I’d printed a list of the multi-cache clues to find. Oh well.

I enjoyed a final shoreline view of gnarled tree cover before the trail looped inland back toward the parking lot.

Next time I’m going back to see what I missed behind the temporary closure sign and to explore the inland parts of the reserve. Maybe I’ll even attempt the earth caches and multis.


APRIL 19, 2017 – M*A*S*H Site (Malibu Creek State Park)

April 19, 2017

I can’t hike long distances and steep hills like I used to. Now I look for short, flat hikes. The one to the M*A*S*H site in Malibu Creek State Park is an old standby.

Just off the crowded parking lot the effects of last month’s rain were evident. The park was greener than I’ve seen it in this decade.

And Malibu Creek flowed freely where for the last few years there was only a rocky dried out stream bed.

On the northern trail, frequently featured in the Kung Fu TV series and the old Planet of the Apes movies/TV I found a recently placed cache and then walked west past an eroded hillside. It’s more impressive in person than in the picture.

Loud muggle noises made the decision to bypass Century Dam, easy. Then there was another stream crossing on a small concrete bridge.

Just before mile 2 I DNF’d a cache that probably washed away. A few minutes later I arrived at the post-1982 fire replacement ambulance at the edge of the old M*A*S*H set.

The original burned out ambulance is still there too.

An ammo can cache, previously in the bushes behind the ambulance has become an unofficial part of the M*A*S*H exhibit. Someone moved it to INSIDE the burned ambulance where muggles find it and sign the log. I watched a group of teens do it.

My return trip on the southern trail passed over the bridge near the visitor’s center. This was the view Vs. 2 years ago.

The roundtrip hike was just over 3 hours at a leisurely pace with short stops to look for 3 caches. I’m glad I did it before the summer heat